Inspiring Purchase + Purpose: Why Video Matters

Companies today, large and small, face a daunting communication challenge.  First, you’re looking to establish a clear identity in a very crowded and noisy marketplace.  Second, you’re looking to attract relevant prospects, convert them to buyers, and encourage their loyalty and advocacy.  Third, you’re looking to attract and motivate the talent you need to grow. And to complicate matters, the old channels of communication have been supplanted by a plethora of new media that seem to multiply every day.  What’s an organization to do?

There’s no silver bullet, no one answer.  But one new medium has clearly emerged as dominant in this new world, and smart use of it is key to success in any and all of these business goals: video.  We’ll spare you the endless stats showing the explosive growth of video consumption (cf. Youtube, Brightcove, Hubspot, etc., etc.). What we want to call out is that video can be used effectively for all of these critical business goals, and further, that a little video strategy can get you a lot more bang for your video buck.

The beauty of video is that it is ideally suited to the new world of digital communication.  On your website, it can be the dramatic cornerstone of your identity, telling the story of who and why you are.  In your sales efforts, it can lend support at every stage of your customer’s journey, across all mediums. Origin stories, customer testimonials, product/service explanations and more can be used on your website, on social media, at events, in targeted advertising campaigns and directly by your salespeople.  And when it comes to projecting your company’s culture and bringing a diverse workforce together, video again has a unique power to tell compelling stories that inspire response.

We see our clients using video in all these ways.  We also see that when clients formulate a clear video strategy – which video types, which channels and when – they get a much higher return on their video spend.  In general, a shift away from mass media to targeted digital is the start. Specifically, leveraging a video production to produce multiple assets expands value across media.  With one shoot we can produce an anchor video for a campaign microsite plus multiple teaser videos for social media. Or a video template with different versions for different target audiences.  Or a suite of related videos that drive home a common message. It’s all about formulating a deeper, longer-range video plan that’s aligned with your marketing plan.

We don’t have to convince you to use video – that’s a given.  But tapping into some video making and marketing expertise can help you use video more effectively.

Innovating with an Innovator

At MK3, we love our customers. It’s even more exciting when they live the American dream and make national news. At President Trump’s 2018 State of the Union address, Carbonite CEO Mohamad Ali, was brought as a guest of Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey (D-Mass.)

Ali grew up in Guyana and came to the United States with his mother when he was 11 years old with $34 dollars in their pockets. Since that time, Ali became a U.S. citizen, graduated with dual degrees, held leadership positions in technology companies, and now as CEO of Carbonite, serves as one of the digital economy’s strongest advocates for net neutrality.

Carbonite sought out MK3’s creative team to come up with ways to engage Carbonite customers about data backup and recovery using video and animation.

MK3 also shot still photography of Carbonite backup solutions for marketing purposes to illustrate customer data centers that protect critical systems from disruptions of any kind.

It’s this kind of leading edge data protection solutions and strategies that MK3 brings to life for Carbonite consumers. MK3 helps brands like Carbonite understand their clients needs and create content that connects and engages them.

As we said at the outset, we love all our clients at MK3 but we really like it when our team gets to innovate with an innovator.

By Ted Wayman, VP of Sales and Business Development

The MK3/Heritage Story

Heritage Plumbing had a modest beginning with two brothers and a pickup truck. Now, twenty years later, they are a regionally recognized brand employing 90 individuals and driving 55 trucks.

What is the key to their success? Their dogged focus on being “the very best service provider with the happiest customers.”

MK3 Creative was welcomed into the family business about a year ago, to assist Heritage in naming their key differentiators. What services are they providing that their customers considered the best?   How is it they have been keeping their customers happy? Three key words rose to the top: cleanliness, expertise, and convenience.

From these, it was difficult to choose only one to take to the “airwaves.” After much thought, they decided that all three were essential to who they were as Heritage. The team jumped all in, deciding to create three thirty-second commercial spots.

Here’s how MK3 and Heritage highlighted “cleanliness,” “expertise,” and “convenience”!

By Joel Kaplan, Principal

Looking in the Mirror as a Marketing Professional

What do you see when you look in the mirror? Maybe you identify yourself by your profession and you see an accountant, a police officer, or a school teacher staring back at you. What do professional marketers see when they look at themselves? Well, that depends on what they’re working on that day.

The term “mirroring” is often used in the service industry to describe the process of adapting and altering your personality to match another person, with the goal of making them feel more comfortable. For many it’s done subconsciously, but others work and develop mirroring like they would with any other skill. It’s a valuable tool that promotes human connection and it can lead to better results with customers and clients. Mirroring is a major facet of providing great service, but it’s also related to a very important aspect of becoming a successful marketing professional.

Within the last month, I’ve worked on projects for financial institutions, doctors/physicians, software engineers, consumer banks, higher education institutions, and many others. For each project, I took the time to research my client’s history, and also looked into their specific industry enough to understand what makes that particular business successful. I looked at the culture, differentiators, challenges, and leadership, and, most importantly, I listened carefully to each of my clients.

Many people in the workforce dedicate themselves to a single profession. It sometimes takes years to figure out exactly what area to choose, but most of the time people spend the duration of their career developing and mastering a specific industry. For those of us in marketing, part of that same process involves learning a little bit about everything. Clients look to us to provide creative solutions, and developing those solutions is dependent on knowing the arena in which that company functions. We spend hours teaching ourselves about those industries, and combine that knowledge with our creative experience to develop an approach.

So what do I see when I look in the mirror? I’m a financial adviser at a global bank, but ask me again next week and I’ll have a different answer.

By Eric Anderson, Account Manager/Producer